SRT Radio

Hunting Links

Arizona Sportsmen for Wildlife Conservation is pleased to present this beautiful specialty license plate. By purchasing this plate you will be making a contribution to Arizona's wildlife and wildlife habitat. Seventeen dollars ($17) of each twenty-five ($25) special license fee will go to AZSFWC's Wildlife Conservation Habitat Fund.  These plates can be purchased at MVD offices around the state or online, and can also be personalized with up to seven (7) characters with an additional $25.

Fishing Links

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Mission :
To conserve, enhance, and restore Arizona's diverse wildlife resources and habitats through aggressive protection and management programs, and to provide wildlife resources and safe watercraft and off-highway vehicle recreation for the enjoyment, appreciation, and use by present and future generations.

Ben Avery Shooting Facility has a discount pass
The daily fee at Ben Avery Shooting Facility Main Range is $7, but shooters get an extra day at the range as a bonus with the 11-visit discount shooter’s pass for just $70. Range visits need not be consecutive and the pass has no expiration date. Call (623) 582-8313 to order the $70 discount pass as a special holiday gift or stocking-stuffer, or you can buy it at the range. The pass is good for the Ben Avery Main Range and Archery Ranges, but not for the Clay Target Center.

Two of three wild-hatched condors have fledged in northern Arizona and southern Utah
Program biologists from The Peregrine Fund and Zion National Park have confirmed that two California condor chicks have left their nests and taken flight in northern Arizona, but hopes of a third chick successfully reaching the fledgling milestone in southern Utah have been dashed by a lack of visual observation. The third chick was Utah’s first wild-hatched condor chick.

Observations of the condor parents visiting the Utah nest cave suggested the chick was doing well during the six months leading up to fledging, but by late November, a month after the predicted fledge date, biologists noted that something was wrong. The Utah chick quit coming out to the cave opening, and soon after, the parents decreased their visitation to the cave. After multiple trips to investigate, biologists concluded that the chick had not survived.

“Although two out of three 2014 condor chicks surviving to fledging remains encouraging, the loss of Utah’s first chick is a hard reminder that critters have a tough go of it in the wild. It’s just a shame that we weren’t able to recover a carcass to examine what might have provided clues as to the cause of death,” said Chris Parish, condor program director for The Peregrine Fund, which manages the wild Arizona-Utah flock.

As for the other two condors now gracing Arizona’s skies, both birds appear to be doing well since fledging. Condors, like other wild animals, are most vulnerable in their first few months. That is why condor parents tend to their young for a year after fledging.

There are now 73 condors in the wild in Arizona and Utah, including the two new fledglings. A total of 25 chicks have hatched in the wild since condors were first reintroduced in Arizona in 1996.

The recovery effort is a cooperative program by federal, state, and private partners, including The Peregrine Fund, Arizona Game and Fish Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Strip Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management, Grand Canyon and Zion national parks, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, and Kaibab and Dixie national forests.

aaaaaaaaaaaaiii